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Oregon Begins Retail Sale of Marijuana Edibles

By Oscar Pascual on June 2, 2016

Oregon residents will finally be able to eat — and dab — their pot as of today.

The state’s recreational marijuana market will expand to include infused edibles, extracts, and topicals beginning on Thursday, the Oregonian reports.

The early sales program allows anyone 21 and over to purchase one single cannabis-infused edible per day. Dosage will be capped at 15 milligrams of THC, allowing for three standard doses of 5mg each. Edibles are expected to range anywhere from $5-15 per item.

Public health officials have emphasized the need for moderation and low dosage when consuming edibles, so as to avoid the mistake of overeating made by unsuspecting first-timers such as the New York Times’ Maureen Dowd. The Oregon Health Authority recommends to not ingest more than the 15 mg THC limit and wait at least 90 minutes before deciding to eat or drink more.

“They say, drink responsibly,” said William Simpson, CEO of Portland-based cannabis retailerChalice Farms, to the Oregonian. “Eat responsibly – that should be the slogan for edibles. Start slow and take your time. Eat a little and wait a long time.”

Anyone purchasing edibles should also keep items out of the reach of children, even if products are clearly labeled.

“You wouldn’t leave your prescription bottle open on the table where your kids could get it, so you treat cannabis edibles and oils the same way. Lock them away, store them in your cupboards,” said Simpson.

Edibles will also be subject to a 25 percent sales tax and a valid driver’s license or government-issued ID will be needed for all transactions.

Non-psychoactive cannabis-based topical products such as lotions and balms will also be available to purchase, as well as pre-filled marijuana extract cartridges used for vaporizers. Topicals will bear a 6 percent THC limit, while cartridges may contain no more than 1,000mg of THC.

Dispensary owners expect a rush of business from those waiting to try out once off-limit items, as well as residents who used to travel to bordering Washington for pot munchies.

“The increase in sales could be very large,” Simpson said. “All that business that was going across state lines will now stay in our own backyards.”

Which do you prefer — edibles, dabs or flowers?